Tag Archive | "Backpacking"

Which Wild Plants Are Edible?


Knowing several wild plants that are edible could make any trip into the wild or any backpacking trip much more enjoyable.

By eating wild berries each morning, you could leave other foods behind, allowing you to pack lighter. Fight other animals if you must to fill yourself with blueberries. Having to carry less weight will make your back feel a lot better.

You will also enjoy backpacking even more, if you know that losing your backpack won’t make you completely helpless, or if a playful raccoon chooses to empty it out for you. There is no need to be a professional survivalist to realize how valuable it would be to know which wild plants are edible.

A lot of people regularly eat pine nuts, dandelions and wild currants. Tons of calories can be found within wild raspberries during any hike. When on islands, you can fill your stomach with wild blueberries. Foraging for berries can easily help anybody in surviving any trip.

Here are several wild berries that are edible on hikes: blueberries, blackberries, currants, high bush cranberries, raspberries, rose hips, service berries, strawberries, and thimbleberries. Berries are highly convenient, as well as high in calories and nutrition compared to other existing wild plants that are edible. They also happen to be the easiest ones to identify.

If you happen to travel to isolated areas in the wilderness, knowing how to identify several wild plants that are edible could also keep you very safe.  You might get injured or lost someday, or perhaps a bear might push you away to fill itself with the freeze-dried meals you decided to bring. No matter what the survival situation, eating would not be top priority (drinking and keeping warm are); however, piles of roasted cattail hearts could easily warm and cheer you up. Plus, they taste good!

Refrain from eating protected plants, naturally, unless the situation really depends on life or death. Do not eat any beautiful flowers, either, or kill lilies by bulb-eating. Use your common sense. Just keep eating berries, if you are unsure on whether you are causing any harm.

If you’d like to take things even further, keep a look out for some books that focus on wild food harvesting. There is no need to turn into a wilderness survival fanatic, but you should learn how to recognize dozens of abundant, high-calorie wild plants that are edible in order to become safer in the wild and enjoy the experience more.

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Survival Kits for Hiking


Survival kits for hiking are packages of simple supplies and tools that are prepared beforehand, in case you need help in wilderness or emergency survival situations. In general, survival kits for hiking comes with important supplies and tools that could aid in offering basic shelter that will work to keep you warm, fight natural hazards, you’re your first aid and health needs, help in getting back home and provide water and food, when necessary.

Here are several tips to put together your own survival kit for hiking:

• Collect items that would be necessary for your kit for outdoor survival. Place them all in a single. This container should be put to use as something to collect water, boil water, cook food and gather water, as well.

• Take your personal needs under consideration. For instance, if you are allergic to bees or dust, or have plans of entering the territory of rattlesnakes, tailor your personal kit to include the required medications.

• Add first aid tools into your survival kit for hiking. First aid needs to include aspiring, bandages, oxytetracycline tablets (for infection and diarrhea) and sterile pads. Also, bring along an additional pair of contact lenses and sunglasses.compass with mirror

• Add mirrors, maps and a mariner’s compass in your survival kit for hiking. The mariner’s compass could aid you in locating the Earth’s magnetic South and North Pole, while maps can guide you, in case you end up getting lost in the wilderness. Maps can also be an aid in locating sources of fresh water if you happen to be in dense forests or arid areas. Mirrors can turn in emergency signaling devices.

• In today’s day and age, GPS devices exist. So, whenever possible, add this device into your survival kit for hiking. GPS devices can highly improve your capability in navigation, as well as prove as an essential tool for survival in the wilderness. GPS devices can help hikers find out their current time, altitude and location and can even be used as emergency signaling devices.

• Bring three days worth of food and water inside your survival kit for hiking. Ensure you can foresee the need for chlorine and iodine tablets for water purification in any emergency.

• A decent amount of money in tiny coins and denominations inside your survival kit for hiking will help in particular situations such as making telephone calls in emergencies or buying mineral water and snacks. If you plan on crossing international boundaries, various currencies could prove to be highly advantageous and beneficial.

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10 Wacky Survival Tips That May Save Your Life!


Here are ten survival tips for the outdoors that aren’t of the regular kind. They stem from unusual tactics that people have come to experiment with. Remember them, in case you ever get lost in the great outdoors.

1. Take pieces of rat nests loose to make use as tinder. They can be located in caves and under rock ledges, so even if it rains, they stay dry. Usually, they are filled with dry grass, plant fuzz and other inflammable materials.

2. Polish bottoms beer or soda cans to use to concentrate sun rays in order to start fires. Chocolate can be used for polishing, but other natural substances may also be used. This is quite hard, though, and won’t work if the sun tends to be low or if the can isn’t very shiny. The can’s bottoms needs to be pointed towards the sun and the rays concentrated towards a tiny point of light onto pieces of paper, natural tinder, or even money.

3. One other great dry tinder source would be old milkweed pods that usually cling on stalks during the winter. Several of them generally come with silky seed fuzz inside that will be dry, even when it rains. Any flame source or spark can ignite it.

4. Glass bottles may be put to use similarly to magnifying glass in order to start fires. When the sun is bright, different kinds of glass are capable of concentrating sun rays to start fires. You can also try out using eyeglasses if you wear them, most of al those with thick prescriptions.

5. One other dry tinder source in wet weather would lie under things, especially under dry leaves or big logs. Just search for something dry and inflammable.

6. Keep batteries with you when the weather is cold since they lose power faster in the cold. Depending what you plan on using them for, they could be essential for survival.

7. In order to cross stream on slippery logs, throw some gravel, grainy dirt or sand onto them to give you some traction. Also, make use of sticks for better balance, if you think this will help you.

8. If you find yourself lost in a desert with a tent, you can use it to gather water. Let rain fly drape directly against it to trap moisture. The condensation that results will collect as small puddles inside the tent that can be drunk directly or scooped up.

9. If you are in need of food, you can find trout where water flows into pools. They can even be chased into shallows or caught by hand.

10. If you have ruined or lost your shoes, look for pine trees which ooze sap and then scrape this off with pieces of wood or bark. Thickly spread onto your soles to glue soft cedar bark strips onto them. It will offer some protection during your walks.

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10 MANDATORY Backpacking Skills


Did you ever go on a backpacking trip which turned out to be a complete disaster, despite the fact that you carried along all the things you would need? Perhaps you brought matches, but weren’t able to get a fire to start anyway. To make sure you have an enjoyable and safe experience in the wilderness, you will need much more than just good gear. You have to know how some things are done, and here is a list to help you get started:

1. Learn how to start a fire. If you need to, practice on your own yard, but try to do so with a single match alone. Then, try it again when it’s raining.

2. Learn how to pitch tents. If this is done incorrectly, rain can enter and the wind could tear its seams. Tents need to be pitched very tight. Also, you have to be able to set tents up within just a couple of minutes.

3. Know how you can keep warm. Practice your camping skills in your own yard, to find out how you can block the wind and how eating foods filled with fat and wearing hats before going to bed can help you stay warm.

4. Learn how to cook over fires. This is not as simple as it sounds. The wind needs to be blocked; the pan needs to be covered; the fire needs to be kept concentrated and small. Practice a lot and set a timer. Doing things faster is always better in emergencies, and keep in mind that there is a possibility of your stove breaking.

5. Learn which plants are edible. Learning how cattails are identified, as well as several edible berries in the wild could turn your trip into a more enjoyable one, most of all if you end up losing all of your food when a bear comes along.

6. Know how you should walk. By knowing how you should pace yourself, as well as walk comfortably on rocky terrain, you can end up less tired; in fact, you could even save yourself from a twisted ankle.

7. Learn all about animals. Find out how you can tell if bears are stalking you and what to do in such a situation. If he makes a lot of noise, he probably just wants to scare you away.

8. Watch the sky. It would be helpful to know whether a storm is coming. Know the basics in weather prediction to ensure more safety.

9. Know simple first aid. An important thing you may want to know is how to recognize hypothermia symptoms and how to treat blisters.

10. Know how to navigate. Maps and compasses will not help if they aren’t used properly.

There is no need to turn into a wilderness survival expert in order to enjoy hiking trips, but it does help to learn something. Use these skills to learn something useful and new.

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