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Desert Survival: Water


Desert Survival: Water

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25 Responses to “Desert Survival: Water”

  1. mrfurball says:

    you know what else is important? long sleeve shirts im just sayin

  2. adventurek9 says:

    Living in AZ, I’ll add that you should avoid wearing sleeveless shirts in the heat, and don a hat that covers your ears and the back of your neck. The direct sunlight will raise your body temp, speeding up symptoms of dehydration & heatstroke.
    Something to note about sports drinks– glucose and sucrose have been found to improve performance, but fructose has been known to cause cramps, stomachache, diarrhea, and bloating in some people that have a “fructose intolerance”.

  3. digitopolis12 says:

    baraka
    lolololol

  4. Firearms4Canada says:

    shutup all you sick fuckers. shes one of the more smart women on earth. she deserves our respect.

  5. 1942nuclear says:

    i hear that for every gallon we need a teaspoon of salt

  6. Commentboy5000 says:

    Wow, people here have nasty comments.

    I live in a desert where the temps reach above 120 Fahrenheit and I recommend adding powdered electrolytes to your gear.

    1. They reduce the need for more water in an extreme situation. Speaking from personal experience, your mileage may vary.

    2. Use clothing that is light but covers most of your body. You lose less moisture.

    3. A hat makes a hell of a difference. I prefer the mesh sided Outdoor Research variety.

  7. keltec556 says:

    PeakSurvival,

    If I was in the desert with you I would drink your milk from your titties and you could drink my sperm. First you have to make me cum though.

  8. bravo2pnx1 says:

    wow nice tip drink the water you brought,i dont think you could survive 3 days lost in a walmart.

  9. maloso1313 says:

    Blah blah water… blah blah blah h2o… blah blah….. aren’t there some dishes needed being done somewhere?

  10. maloso1313 says:

    okay I will say it… Thats not Egypt….

  11. RandomConcepts says:

    Everyone wants to get a glimpse of this lady’s ass. Admit it.

  12. RandomConcepts says:

    Damned noisy, terrain-trashing ATVs. So much for the “survival” aspect of this.

  13. PHARRAOH says:

    you are so hot! it’s you, not the sun. :-) in this vid, you resemble kerri from myth busters. ooooh, she’s hot as well but i totally prefer you! hiking with you, i’d end up walking right off a cliff. No survival in that!

  14. ifukbak says:

    LESS OF UR FACE AND MORE OF THE CAMP

  15. Tradekraft says:

    nedljkomostar, when I was in Kuwait I drank 6 liters of water one day and was still hospitalized for dehydration….everyone is different. Elevation, temp, where your used to being vs. where you are, and all kinds of other things factor into how much a person needs to take in. Your lucky to be able to get by on what you have.

  16. nedeljkomostar says:

    I am sorry to tell you this but you really don’t need to drink that much water as you are saying. I remember I used to walk on top of the 6KFt high mountains for 4 to 5 hours and to drink only one or two times a cup of water and I was ok. And if you drink water all the time while you walk you will wash out lubricating saliva from you trout what makes you to have rasp dry breathing asking even for more water.

  17. sweetypie000 says:

    simple, eat some more rabbit eyeballs or go out into the desert with me because i’d dehydrate to death after i’d given you all my water rations baby damn you are hot… like the desert

  18. WannaBEEfarmer says:

    Please do a video on your head covering.
    thank you.

  19. Killahofosho says:

    you are a hottie and i would love to see you do some real survival hahaha

  20. mlndstream says:

    @achborkah I also had a scary situation once hiking on a hot dry day in Australia drinking plain water,didn’t know to consume 250ml every 15 minutes,and it was such a hot day I got heat stroke in less than 1.5hrs carrying over 30kg up out of valley which was almost all up hill,the numbness+panicky shallow breathing only passed when I got sodium into me,it was the sports drink that almost made me weep with joy with the first mouthful,extra water and fruit(carbs and potassium) did nothing for me

  21. achborkah says:

    @mlndstream no problem my friend, didn’t read your first post carefully enough.

  22. mlndstream says:

    @achborkah rereading my statement I can see why It could seem I thought that sugar and electrolytes were the same thing, but I know their not, but from what I have read, a small amount of carbohydrate in the water speeds the absorption of the water itself, also that the addition of a certain amount of electrolytes also speeds the absorption.

  23. mlndstream says:

    @achborkah yeah, from what I have read most people can absorb 250ml of water ever 15 minutes, although some people have recently been found to be able to absorb 250ml in 10 minutes, but most can only absorb 1 litre and hour which is pretty much the same amount of water as 32 ounces as you have stated so there seems to be a pretty good consensus on that.

  24. achborkah says:

    @mlndstream Sugar and electrolytes are not the same thing. Most sports drinks have sugar in them so that they are not completely nasty to drink. The electrolytes are vital to your bodies nerve and muscle functions, and you can actually drink too much water and flush your bodies system of its electrolytes. The symptoms of this are similar to dehydration…which makes most people drink more water…which makes it worse. Been there, not fun.

  25. achborkah says:

    @mlndstream Your body can absord 24 to 32 ounces of water an hour during exercise. This means that your body can’t absorb water as fast as it sweats it out. Dehydration is also cumulative, so if you continually drink a little less than you need, your body will eventually dehydrate. That being said, if you have to do hard work in extreme heat, you must start your hydration well before, and continue it well after your exertion. Resting during the heat of the day in a desert is the best plan.

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